Super Bowl and Your DVR

Let me understand this correctly, people spend all year becoming professionsal DVR jockeys….getting their timing right so they can fast forward through all the commercials in their favorite shows to nail the timing so that they don’t miss a second of an episode. Right? I’ve witnessed it.

Then, annually, everyone tunes into a football game to actually watch the thing they’ve been fast forwarding through all year…the commercials. I know, I know….they are entertaining (you tell yourself). Those commercials that you usually fast forward through during that sitcom might be entertaining as well (but I doubt it).

Just so I’ve got this clear, if you’re into football it makes sense, tune into your big game and deal with the commercials as a means to watch your game. If you’re not into football, why the hell would you sit through three hours of a game you don’t like so you could “watch the commercials”. You have hours of those stockpiled on your DVR already. Fire it up and hit play if you’re really that into commercials.

If you care to share:
This entry was posted in Really? and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • Almost Random Quote

    Tom said to himself that it was not such a hollow world, after all. He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it – namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain. If he had been a great and wise philosopher, like the writer of this book, he would now have comprehended that Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. And this would help him to understand why constructing artificial flowers or performing on a tread-mill is work, while rolling ten-pins or climbing Mont Blanc is only amusement. There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger-coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service, that would turn it into work and then they would resign. — Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer, 1876